262. conciliate

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“Over the course of just a few years, as I would go home to Spokane to visit [my friends], instead of them asking me what TV show or movie I’d been in, they asked me if I’d met anyone. And I was sort of asking myself the same question—and with growing concern. I thought: “Wait a minute—when did I go from being the cool one that people envied to being the one the people were a little worried about?”

“And I watched my friends’ marriages become longer, more knowing marriages; and their kids getting big and bigger; and the walks after dinner with the dog; and all the talk about the lake cabins. And I began to wonder if maybe they hadn’t made all the right decisions.” – Julia Sweeney, In the Family Way


elegant wine glass broken on a dark background

It’s been an intense last couple of weeks since last we met.

Let’s work backwards from today.

Last Thursday my housemate’s dog was attacked by what we’re 99% sure was a coyote.

Around 11:30pm, I looked in the back room and there was one dog sleeping but not the other, which gave me a bad feeling. When I went outside to look for him, I found him about halfway out in the middle of the backyard, collapsed and bloody.

I quickly bundled him inside, unsure of how badly he was hurt. We called the nearest 24-hour vet clinic and drove him over. He was in rough shape, with more lacerations and bite marks than we initially saw, and ended up being there a few days until he was eating again and moving around.

He’s home now, on some pretty fantastic pain medication, and slowly recovering, but it was horrific to find him like that.


Going back further, a week prior to the coyote attack, I was physically assaulted at a friend’s house.

Yeah.

The short version is that me, my friend Ben, and Jason, a housemate of my friends, were talking. He and Ben were in a heated discussion about the causes of the ’91 U.S. invasion of Iraq, and at one point Jason (who is a veteran) held up his arm to display a scar from a bullet wound, as if definitive evidence for his position.

As politely as he could, Ben said something to the effect of, “Just because you were wounded doesn’t mean you’re right.”

(In hindsight, we should’ve realized we weren’t dealing with a rational person.)

This is when Jason stood up and yelled at Ben: “Get the fuck out of this house.”

When we both just stared at him in dismay, he screamed “You think I’m kidding?”, marched over, grabbed Ben and physically tried to throw him outside.

At this point, out of concern, I tried to intervene.

All of this happened in the span of about fifteen seconds, and at some point I should’ve realized how stupid that was. However, I have no experience with physical violence, preferring to leave physical altercations to the Cro Magnons among us.

So this is when Jason grabbed me by the throat, shoved me backwards into the kitchen, and slammed me against the wall several times. I don’t remember much about the attack, but it was horrific. I’m still emotionally shaken from the incident, haven’t been sleeping well, suffering from flashbacks, etc.

All symptoms of PTSD.

Yay. Because I need more emotionally damaged shit to deal with.

The next day I filed a police report, and the officers basically told me that since I wasn’t injured enough that there wasn’t any grounds to take any further action since the city is bogged down enough with violent crime and domestic abuse cases as it is.

To top it off, my friends that he lives with, who I’ve known for some time and whose wedding I was in last year, have no plans to evict him from their home, though he attacked me, unprovoked.

Basically, my relationship with my friends is now strained because, although they acknowledge he was squarely in the wrong, they’ve refused to take any punitive action against Jason, arguing that throwing him out would do more harm than good.

And turns out that, although I filed a police report, prosecutors are unlike to press charges because I wasn’t injured enough.

So no, I’m still not okay.


My therapist had a few observations to make about all this when we met on Monday.

Aside from my personal safety, she’s concerned about the ultimatum that I made a few days after the attack to the homeowners that so long as Jason continues to live with them that our friendship can’t continue.

Frankly, I’m concerned too, since it continues a pattern in my relationships that whenever I feel threatened or put in an impossible situation (such as with my parents, who saw nothing wrong with wanting me to be part of the family while they continuing to hold hateful and bigoted views about me).

Yes, I cut off my parents.

I cut off friends I’d known for years from college and church who opposed marriage equality in Minnesota in 2012.

I cut off friends who remained friends with Seth after he dumped me in 2011, interpreting that as their taking his side over mine… and turning against me.

Essentially, my therapist mused, growing up in a household where everything was closely scrutinized through a lens of Reformed, Atonement theology, and where I legitimately felt in peril for much of those formative years as a closeted gay man, it’s natural that I’d still be on high alert, fearful of people turning on me or attacking.

How is that past orientation limiting my present relationships, I wondered. Is it?

How is that narrative script of fear causing me to become intractable and stubborn, and how is it closing me off to future happiness?

How, like Uncle Andrew in C. S. Lewis’ The Magician’s Nephew, do I cleverly defend myself “against all that might do you good!”

But more on sex next time.

Because you really wanted to know, right?

 

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3 thoughts on “262. conciliate

  1. Violet

    Interesting. If it’d been a woman who was assaulted I wonder if your friends would have had a different opinion of the incident. Since you’re a man though, being grabbed by the throat and thrown against the wall many times is “no big deal.” I can tell you in no uncertain terms if that had happened to me (a female), I would never step foot in that house again ever, and any friend who thinks otherwise wouldn’t be someone I’d trust. This man has an explosive temper…what if next time he doesn’t just throw you against the wall, what if he pulls out a gun?

    You may have a long history of cutting people off when you feel threatened, but I think this is different. Physical violence is nothing to mess with…the fact that it’s deemed “no big deal,” probably because you’re a man, is sexist and unsupportive. I know the police are overwhelmed with domestic violence cases and can’t help, but that doesn’t mean you can’t look out for YOURSELF. Stay away from that guy!

    • David

      Oh, I definitely think there’s a sexist element to the apparent lack of concern. Men aren’t supposed to be traumatized or feel victimized by violence. After all, we’re the more violent sex, right? [Sarcasm.] Don’t worry, I’ve made it very clear that so long as he continues to live with them that I won’t be setting foot anywhere near their property. Several other people who were at the house that night have expressed similar sentiments.

  2. Allan Paul

    You are absolutely right to be upset with the “friends” who are enabling their roommate’s behavior! I would remain polite and not unfriendly on neutral ground, but assiduously avoid their living space as long as Jason is living there. Your danger detecto-meter is functioning appropriately: this guy could very easily have guns.
    Your protective pattern of cutting people off reminds me of my analogous lifelong protective pattern of never considering (immediately cutting off) opportunities apply for a new job, go someplace unfamiliar, try a new activity, learn a new skill (aka be a novice), in short do anything that might possibly result in “failure”, especially public failure. It has stunted my life, left me with a lot of “what ifs…” and has been a lifelong struggle to acknowledge and deal with.
    Thanks for sharing, and thanks for prompting some introspection on my part, David.

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